The Real Experience of Entrepreneurs in New Orleans

This post was originally published on NOEW.org. New Orleans Entrepreneur Week is a festival celebrating entrepreneurship and innovation in New Orleans. 

Hello, and welcome to The Distillery!

We’re so glad you’re here.

If you’re reading this, you might be an entrepreneur. Or someone who thinks differently. Perhaps you have an idea, and you’re looking for a little inspiration to get started.

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, or you just like hustle, you’re in the right place.

We believe that all passionate people have a hustle-something that they feel strongly about and work tirelessly at–whether it’s building a new business, honing a craft, or writing a novel.

The Distillery is about sharing the real experience of entrepreneurs in New Orleans. Plenty of stories have been told that make entrepreneurship seem glamorous. But we know that the entrepreneurial experience is hard and exhausting.

Those are the stories we are here to tell. We won’t sell you a dream. But we’ll be your biggest supporters if you have one.

We’ll also celebrate your successes. Here, you’ll find insight, advice and inspiration for entrepreneurs, by entrepreneurs.

So come by, stay a while. Share your stories and your struggles with us.

Do you want to share your story, or contribute as a guest writer? What stories do you want to read here?

Let’s talk. You can reach us anytime at thedistillerylife@gmail.com.

Here’s to hustling.

Summer Suleiman, Editor of The Distillery

This post was originally published on NOEW.org. New Orleans Entrepreneur Week is a festival celebrating entrepreneurship and innovation in New Orleans. See it all happen this year March 19-24, 2017.

Summer Suleiman, Editor of The Distillery

Summer Suleiman is the Editor of The Distillery. She writes about the real experience of entrepreneurs in New Orleans.

1 Comment
  1. Small business is not pntserely represented in the politics of the federal government. The big three big business, big unions, and big politicians do not want true small business to have a seat at the table. In 2009, Australia passed the Fair Trade Act which formally recognized small businesses as having under 15 employees. The constituency of our SBA is any company with less than 500 employees, 99.7% of all small businesses. This definition of small is no different than calling anyone under 7 tall short . But it allows politicians to say they are helping small businesses when they pass tax breaks and raise loan ceiling for businesses with 250+ employees.We need to dismantle the existing SBA, build a new one, and restore the cabinet level position for a small business advocate, not so we can also get bailouts, handouts, and undeserved loans, but to work to stop all of this going to big businesses masquerading as small.

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